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Mid-South Sheriffs Oppose New Gun Legislation

Several Mid-South sheriffs are taking to the internet to express their views, saying they won't support or enforce any laws they believe are unconstitutional.
DESOTO COUNTY, MS (abc24.com) - President Obama continues to push stricter gun control and opponents are pushing right back.

Law enforcement officials and politicians across the country are speaking out against any measures they say would interfere with constitutional rights.

Several Mid-South sheriffs are taking to the internet to express their views, saying they won't support or enforce any laws they believe are unconstitutional.

Several here in the Mid-South are using Facebook to push back.

"I think it's great the governor and the sheriff have come out," says Julian Smith.

DeSoto Sheriff Bill Rasco posted his support to make "any unconstitutional order by the President illegal to enforce by state or local law enforcement."

"That federal and state stuff gets a little weird," says Marty Pulley.

"I think it's a great idea. If they're going to pass a whole bunch of new laws, they haven't enforced the old laws," Smith says.

Rasco wrote his deputies will not infringe on anyone's constitutional rights. The post had almost 1,500 likes and 200 comments within hours.

They run the gamut from "I love being a resident of DeSoto County, this is why," to "This is nothing but rhetoric and posturing."

"It's not the gun. It's the person," says Beth Jaimez. "Do something about the person and that will solve all the problems. Quit fighting about it."

In West Tennessee, Dyer County Sheriff Jeff Box put up a similar post. His quickly had 200 likes and 57 comments, most saying thank you.

"Telling anyone they can't own a particular gun is just like telling you you've got to drive a little car instead of a big car," Smith tells abc24.com.

The president is seeking a ban on assault weapons, high capacity magazines and stronger background checks.

What Congress will pass into law remains to be seen; so does the reaction from state and local law enforcement.

"Federal law trumps state law," Smith says. "I have no idea how they propose to do this. We'll see if it happens. At some point somebody is going to test it."

Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham writes he is a strong supporter of the second amendment, but will not say one way or the other how he views the proposed new legislation.
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