Syrian Father and Son Living in Memphis, Following Violence at Home

Syrian Father and Son Living in Memphis, Following Violence at Home

A Syrian father and son left the country nine months ago fearing for their safety. They're now living in Cordova.
CORDOVA, TN -- Senate majority leader Harry Reid will formally file a resolution tomorrow that would allow a military strike against Syria. A vote to move ahead on the measure could occur on September 11th.

The news is being followed closely around the world, including here in the Mid-South. A Syrian father and son left the country nine months ago fearing for their safety. They're now living in Cordova.

We're not going to reveal the father and son's real names. They still have family in Syria. There's a chance their loved ones could be punished because they talked with us. That fear of violence is just one of the reasons they left Damascus.

"I told my wife, what's the point of staying? I told her come on let's go to Egypt, that Cairo was much better. This was nine months ago." We'll call them the Zawa family. They're now living worlds apart because of violence in Syria.

"It started with my son going to his school. Every time they (searched) him," the dad says. They being government soldiers for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. "They are controlling everything."

"The name of his school is Bashar Assad School."

Feeling unsafe, the family first fled to Egypt. When trouble started there, father and son came to America. Wife and daughter still haven't been approved to enter the United States.

"We're not homesick, but we want the wife and the daughter to come. I have a beautiful daughter. She's so pretty and so clever."

"I miss her too much," says her brother. We'll call him Sammy.

He's able to go to high school and live in Memphis because he was born in the US.

"I was an aicraft engineer," his father says. "I used to come over here often to America."

Sammy was born on one of dad's work trips. His father's now working as a security guard.

Both he and Sammy are paying close attention to how their new country is responding to Syria.

"We love America," he says. "We don't want America to be hurt."

They're waiting to see what Congress decides to do, but they don't know what the right answer is.

"The right answer? Basher Assad must go. In any way. He's killing (Syrians) and he's like father to the people. This chemical weapon? How he use it on his own people?"

The Zawas had a friend living in Memphis. That's how they ended up here. The family longs to reunite. They're hoping that will happen eventually.
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