Baptist Patients Treated in Special Elvis Presley Room

Baptist Patients Treated in Special Elvis Presley Room

When Elvis Presley needed a doctor, he went to one at Baptist. He started going in the 1960's and was a patient up until his death. Today, the hospital group has a special room dedicated to the "King of Rock and Roll."
MEMPHIS, TN -- When Elvis Presley needed a doctor, he went to one at Baptist. He started going in the 1960's and was a patient up until his death. Today, the hospital group has a special room dedicated to the "King of Rock and Roll."

The Elvis room is at Baptist's Germantown office off of Wolf River Boulevard. It's probably the most unique patient room in the city.

"Elvis was a patient of the medical group, a patient of Dr. Nichopoulos at our old office in Midtown," says Dr. Mark Castellaw.

When the office moved a few years ago, the Elvis room moved too. It's wall to wall Elvis.

"Occasionally, we'll have Elvis music going through the building," Castellaw says.

Baptist's Elvis connection doesn't stop there.

It's also with Barbara Klein Bauer, a 50 year employee. She's the one who brought Elvis to Baptist.

"He and Dr. Nichopoulos bonded immediately and he became our patient," Bauer says. She was dating George Klein, one of Elvis' best friends. "There were so many interesting times."

Elvis was the best man at her wedding. In fact, he proposed to her in a way.

Bauer was working in Nashville when Elvis called.

"Elvis said, 'I'm getting you out of there tomorrow. We're gonna fly all of your friends to Las Vegas and get married.' And I said, 'wait a minute Elvis. What are you talking about?" Bauer said. "He said 'You're gonna get married to George and I'm gonna handle everything."

"He was so excited. And I said, 'Wait a minute. George didn't ask me to marry him.' He said, 'I'm asking you,'" she said. "It was really exciting to be a friend of his. He made each one of us feel special."

Even though he's gone, Elvis' room at the hospital is making patients feel special.

"Patients come in and they're hurting. They're sick and feel bad," Castellaw says. "Sometimes just coming in this room uplifts them, just to have something fun to look at."

He adds the room is so popular some patients request it and are even willing to wait longer for it.
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