Contractors Booted from City's Embattled HARP Program

Contractors Booted from City's Embattled HARP Program

Six contractors have now been kicked out of the HARP program, a taxpayer-funded program meant to help low income and senior citizens renovate and repair their homes.
MEMPHIS, TN (abc24.com) - Six contractors have now been kicked out of the HARP program, a taxpayer-funded program meant to help low income and senior citizens renovate and repair their homes.

Help is finally on the way for one homeowner, but others are still waiting.

Annie Neely is relieved now that a new contractor is at fixing what the previous city-paid contractor either didn't do, or didn't do right.

In March, ABC 24 News showed you a list of problems at Neely's house, which included a bad roof repair, a paint job that was never completed, new linoleum already peeling, and her once working toilet that stopped flushing properly after the first contractor got a hold of it.

The city paid $35,000 for the first round of shoddy renovations; the new contractor is being paid another $16,000 to fix the mistakes.

Nathan Anderson from Anderson Contracting is correcting the work.

"It should take two weeks to come in here and bring in the right subs and licensed people, and kind of correct some of the things that might've been wrong," he said.

While Neely's home is being repaired, several other upset homeowners we highlighted over the last six months are still waiting.

Joy Brent says city-paid contractors messed up her electrical system. So far she has heard nothing from the city.

Patricia Sawyer is also still waiting for her home to be fixed after city-paid contractors botched it up.

Housing and Community Development Director Robert Lipscomb didn't want to talk about the HARP program. "I told you I am not going to deal with individual situations," he stated.

Saywer's contractor and the original contractor at Neely's house were two of the six kicked out of the program.

Back at Neely's house, Anderson said he watched our original stories about homeowners having problems with HARP contractors. He noted, "I couldn't believe it was this program because I know some of the quality of work, and I know some of the things they hold me to, and I just couldn't believe it."

Neely believes if the shoddy work hadn't been exposed, the bad contractors would still be at it - and you'd still be paying for it.

In addition to Lipscomb not wanting to sit down and talk to us, the city has also been stalling on turning over records.

In March a request was made to see all the 2012 HARP files, which according to Tennessee law, they have to turn over. Despite one promise from the city after another that access would be granted to those records, it has yet to happen.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus