Deadline Approaching for City's Promised Revamp of HARP

Deadline Approaching for City's Promised Revamp of HARP

You paid for it. A floor repair that is so bad brand new tiles are popping up, plus a bathroom remodel that a north Memphis homeowner can't use are just the latest examples of Memphis' failing home repair program.
MEMPHIS, TN (abc24.com) - You paid for it. A floor repair that is so bad brand new tiles are popping up, plus a bathroom remodel that a north Memphis homeowner can't use are just the latest examples of Memphis' failing home repair program.

For months ABC 24's Senior Investigator Jeni Diprizio has been showing you botched construction jobs done through the city's HARP program.

Once again we invited Mayor A C Wharton and the Director of Housing and Community Development, Robert Lipscomb, out to see the work done by city hired contractors. They declined. But, homeowner Mattie Taylor wants you see it.

"I think it's pitiful, really pitiful," she said of the work done at her north Memphis home.

City hired contractors were supposed to even her floors, but if you take a close look you'll notice what might be considered speed bumps throughout the house. The uneven floors are causing the brand new tiles to pop up, and that's not all.

Taylor, who uses a wheelchair, can't even get into the bathroom in her bedroom. Contractors installed a new toilet and sink. The family expected the door would be widened but that never happened. Now Taylor says it's a safety hazard.

"If I fall it would be hard for someone to get me out of there and I didn't want to fall no more."

"When we first talked to them they made promises like this is going to be like a brand new house and its going to be great," said Fannie Allen, Taylor's daughter. "It wasn't the type of quality of work I would have expected."

This is just the latest example of problems with home repairs done through the HARP program.

We found newly installed kitchen sinks that leak, toilets that don't flush, sinks that won't drain, walls left unfinished, and the list goes on and on.

Your tax money is paying for these shoddy repairs.

Just last week we asked city HARP employees how this could happen, but they didn't want to talk.

Allen does. She says the bottom line is accountability to taxpayers and the homeowner, like her mom.

"Once they are chosen to do the work they should be doing a satisfactory job and they should work until it is complete."

The city vows the HARP program will be revamped by April 1st. That's now less than two weeks away. We'll be watching to see if it happens.

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