From Syria, Memphis Siblings Differ on What America Should Do

From Syria, Memphis Siblings Differ on What America Should Do

For the Sakan family, to attack Syria or not depends on who you ask. The siblings both were born in Syria, but now live in Memphis.
Memphis, TN -- For the Sakan family, to attack Syria or not depends on who you ask. The siblings both were born in Syria, but now live in Memphis. 

Abdo Sakan, who owns an antique store on Poplar Avenue, welcomes attacking Syria.

"To be honest with you, I think if we do not do anything now, I believe it will be the biggest mistake," Sakan said.

Sakan moved to the United States 35 years ago. His mother, two brothers and a sister still live in Syria.

"They found a lot of bullets in their gardens, they found bullets in their gardens? Yes Sir, they find blanks all the time," he said.

Sakan's sister, Raffe, runs Raffe's Deli down the street and totally disagrees with her brother.

"My close family, the say how come you don't want America to help? I don't. Because this is not the way," she said.

The Sakan's illustrate the debate going on in the Mid-South regarding what to do about Syria. 

On Wednesday evening, more than a dozen protestors held up signs against any attack at the corner of Highland and Park.

"This is Iraq all over again," Joseph Davis said. "Where they are lying to us about what's going on to try and propel us into another war that is not needed."

While the Sakan's differ on a plan of action, both acknowledge something must change. Both worry greatly about their family still living there.

"War is pain, it is fear, I don't know, it is just pray to God things will be better," Raffe Sakan said.

"This man is a mad man, he will not stop, he will not stop unless, knowing he has no other choice," Abdo Sakan said.
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