Memphis Inspection Stations Closed, Jobs Lost

Memphis Inspection Stations Closed, Jobs Lost

For the first time in about 80 years, the City of Memphis is out of the auto inspection business. The end came at 3:00 Friday afternoon.
MEMPHIS, TN (localmemphis.com) - For the first time in about 80 years, the City of Memphis is out of the auto inspection business. The end came at 3:00 Friday afternoon.

Memphis City Council members voted to stop inspections after learning the city lost $2 million a year running the system. It didn't stop people from lining up for the tail pipe finale.

The real purpose of the inspections over the last few years has been to try and keep the air clean. It's failed miserably, because even though the feds say all of Shelby County has nasty air, only Memphis drivers had to get inspections. Not anymore.

People were predicting the inspection stations would be empty on the last day. Next week all anybody needs to do is go to the Shelby County Clerk's Office and they'll get their registration and tags; they don't need to show that their cars have been inspected. That was news to some people.

It's easy to lose track of all the things happening in the world. Getting the car inspected in Memphis is often a last minute thing, and this is the last day in June people could get it done - even though they didn't need to get it done, because all the County Clerk's offices won't ask for inspection information starting July 1.

Driver Renee Sesley told Local 24 News, "I think it's hard on the city for people losing their jobs, but at the same time its easier for us to do what they county does."

She mentioned people losing their jobs. About one hundred people were out of work as these inspection stations closed. This last day hasn't been an easy day.

Another driver in line, Diane Sanford, said, "I was just talking to a man who… he got a little teary-eyed. I did too. I hate for them to lose their jobs."

"Oh my God, I just talked to this one guy and he said they've already come to take away his ID badge and everything so, you know, I hate to see anybody lose their jobs," added Angela Young.

There are plenty of people who are happy that one annual pain in the neck is gone.

"I think it's good," said driver Wes Belote, "One less hassle to go through."

The state won't run it. The county won't run it. But the feds might demand it and start playing hardball with officials in order to get inspections going again.

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