State Takeover Means Service Gap for Vehicle Inspections

State Takeover Means Service Gap for Vehicle Inspections

We've gone through an awful lot when it comes down to these inspection stations, but wait until you hear what's going to be happening soon.
MEMPHIS, TN (abc24.com) - Fasten your seatbelts, getting your car inspected in Memphis is about to become a bumpy ride. The city is getting out of the inspection business next month; the county won't do it and the state is not ready to take over yet.

We've gone through an awful lot when it comes down to these inspection stations, but wait until you hear what's going to be happening soon.

First off, the employees of these places are working every day, knowing that by the end of June, they are officially no longer employed by the City of Memphis. There's no guarantee what their future holds for them.

According to Memphis City Councilman Jim Strickland, "Those workers may be picked up by the state of tennessee when they take over a few months after that."

Stop right there. About those last five words Jim Strickland said, "…a few months after that." Strickland says he's heard the state won't start doing inspections until possibly September.

If your car registration is up in July or August, he and others don't have a clue what you'll have to do. It's a mess, and he admits it.

"It would have been a smoother transition had the county picked it up. There would have been more local control over the issue. But the county just consistently said they do not want to do it."

That's nothing new; the city wasn't hit by a surprise.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell met with all sorts of folks and said his people told him that legally, the county couldn't do it. Not to mention his side of the government street is fighting for every nickel and dime the city is.

The city got out of the inspection business because it was losing $2 million a year, and they hoped the inspection program would become county-wide, and not just in the city.

"The City of Memphis was the only city in the county, and probably the only city in the state, who was doing their own inspections. And it's a state function. We ought to let the state take it over," Strickland stated.

Bottom line to all of this is, it's been a mess, it's a mess now, and it's going to remain a mess.

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