Verizon Phone Records Monitored under Secret Court Order

Verizon Phone Records Monitored under Secret Court Order

Critics are describing it as a huge government over-reach. They're reacting to news that the government has been secretly collecting the phone records of millions of U.S. customers of Verizon under a top-secret court order.
WASHINGTON (AP) - Critics are describing it as a huge government over-reach. They're reacting to news that the government has been secretly collecting the phone records of millions of U.S. customers of Verizon under a top-secret court order.

The activity was first reported by the British newspaper The Guardian. And now, the chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee -- Dianne Feinstein of California -- is confirming that the court order is a three-month renewal of an ongoing practice.

In fact, a U.S. official says the sweeping roundup of U.S. phone records has been going on for years, and was a key part of the Bush administration's warrantless surveillance program.

Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon -- a frequent critic of government actions dealing with Americans' privacy -- says the administration should disclose the facts.

And former Vice President Al Gore tweeted that privacy is essential in the digital era. He wrote, "Is it just me, or is secret blanket surveillance obscenely outrageous?"

The chairman of the House Intelligence committee says the ongoing NSA search of telephone records thwarted an attempted terrorist attack in the United States in the last few years.

Republican Rep. Mike Rogers of Michigan defended the telephone records collection at a Capitol Hill news conference on Thursday. He said the information culled from the records enabled U.S. authorities to stop a "significant case."

White House spokesman Josh Earnest says he can't discuss classified information. But he says the court order in question allows the intelligence community to know when terrorists or suspected terrorists are engaging in dangerous activities. He says that's particularly true for people located in the U.S.

He says the order doesn't allow the government to listen in on calls, but only includes details like telephone numbers.

Earnest says there's a robust legal regime overseeing the program and that Congress has been fully briefed.

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