Memphis Man Gets Life Changing Surgery

Memphis Man Gets Life Changing Surgery

For the last 14 years William Larkett has struggled, living with a giant growth on the side of his neck. His condition affected every part of his life. He became homeless, then addicted to drugs. But no more.
MEMPHIS, TN (localmemphis.com)-- A Memphis man has a new lease on life tonight. For the last 14 years William Larkett has struggled, living with a giant growth on the side of his neck.

His condition affected every part of his life. He became homeless, then addicted to drugs. But no more.

Larkett just received free care and surgery from Baptist. In Mid-October, Baptist doctors removed the mass on his neck. He's now recovering and healing beautifully.

It's more than just a physical transformation for Larkett. He's emotionally and spiritually changed too.

"I just see another man in the mirror that's all I see. A totally different person." In many ways he is. Larkett hardly recognizes himself.

"I'm a new, new man."

A few bandages are the only remaining signs of the mass he lived with the last 14 years.

"14 years. I never thought it would be gone."

It didn't affect him physically. "I did 200 pushups a day." But mentally, it was a whole different story.

"It was hard to meet new people," Larkett says. "If someone walked by, a person that I didn't know, they'll look at you like ooooh."

Larkett's a veteran, who worked as a mechanic after he left the military.

When the mass on his neck developed, life became hard.

"They wouldn't hire me because they thought I was more like handicapped, like a disability. But i'm not disabled."

"I became homeless. That's how I ended up here. Jobs and stuff weren't going right. I ended up in and out of jail and on drugs. So I came here."

Here is Memphis' Union Mission. It's where he met Operation Outreach director Jan Taylor, who asked Larkett if he needed help.

"I said if you don't mind my asking sir, the area on your neck -- has anyone ever tired to help you with that or tell you what that is? He said no," Taylor remembers.

"I didn't have any insurance," Larkett says. "Any of that you know."

Baptist doctors treat the homeless for free. They checked Larkett out, and found good news: the growth wasn't cancerous.

They removed it without any problems and he's now on the road to recovery.

"Jesus saved my life. All I can say is he made me see this isn't place you should be."

Larkett's determined to make the most of his new life. He's drug free and wants to stay that way. He's enrolled in a six month rehab and recovery program.

"I'm going to go ahead and finish it. From there, I really don't know. But it's going to be something good for me I pray."

Larkett's just one of the mobile clinic's success stories. Baptist's Operation Outreach partners with Christ Community Health Services.

Each year they treat more than 3,000 homeless patients in Memphis.
Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus