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'This is huge': Mississippi woman spends months on set of national TV series

ABC's 'Women of the Movement' is a six-part drama series about the murder of Emmitt Till and how his mother, Mamie Till-Mobley, became an activist.

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — ABC’s new, limited series ‘Women of the Movement’ has ties to the Mid-South. Not only was the series shot here, a Mississippi woman worked on set.

For years, Sharrika Evans shared stories on stage.

"I've always kind of been interested in the arts,” said Evans. “I did stage plays, but my overall passion has always been film.”

Creating moments on screens across Americas is her goal.

“For a very long time, I was super nervous about getting into the industry,” said Evans. "Being from Mississippi, we didn't receive a lot of opportunities within the arts."

The big break she needed happened in her home state. 

ABC's 'Women of the Movement' is a six-part drama series about the murder of Emmitt Till and how his mother, Mamie Till-Mobley, became an activist.

“This is huge. I'm from Mississippi. I get to tell him Mississippi's story,” said Evans. "For this to have been my first TV project, I could not have asked for a better experience than ‘Women of the Movement.’"

It’s a job Evans said she almost turned down.

“When I first got the call, because they couldn’t tell me exactly what the project was, I wasn't going to take the project,” said Evans. “And then he told me who the director was for the first episode.”

RELATED: Tune in to ABC 24 Thursday for 'Women of the Movement'

Working with ‘Love and Basketball’ Director Gina Prince-Bythewood was another dream come true for this aspiring director.

“Just imagine meeting the person that inspired you to start this,” said Evans. “I was such in awe when I met Gina. I never forget the day that we were shooting the scene. She looked over at me and she was like, ‘Sharrika, do you want to come over and watch the monitor with me?’ And I was trying to hold my tears in while walking over to the monitor. I don't even think she knew how big that moment was for me.”

For six months, Sharrika worked on the assistant director's team in Greenwood, Mississippi, learning from other Women of Color in film.

“I just felt so loved. I felt cared for everything, every little piece of advice that I wish they gave to me without any hesitation. It was just a magical experience," said Evans.  

Now, seeing the series come alive on screen she's more determined than ever and encouraging others to follow their dreams.

“If there's something that you dream about it, work forward,” said Evans. “Work on your craft, learn your craft, and be prepared for the opportunity because it'll come."