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How a 12-year-old Germantown violinist learned life lessons by raising money for camp

“It felt really nice because knowing that there’s people who really want to help you and what you’re trying to do is really nice,” said Amelia Boer, violinist.

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — You are never too old or young to accomplish your goals. All you need is an idea action, and drive.

One young violinist learned that lesson early.

When words can’t do justice, Germantown’s 12-year-old Amelia Boer plays her violin.

“It helps you be able to express what you feel,” said Boer.

She feels thankful and driven.

Boer has been playing the violin for more than four years. She got to hone her skill at violin camp last year.

“I’ve got to learn so much from all these amazing players. I just really would like to go this year,” said Boer.

This year, her parents had a different idea for attending camp.

“My parents decided that this year, they would pay for half of it. I still had to pay for the other half to teach me responsibility,” said Boer.

It is a new octave for Boer, but one she was determined to embrace.

“I was thinking of a way I could raise money. I had been having a jewelry business on the side for a couple years. I realized that would probably be the perfect way to start being able to support myself and get my way to the camp,” said Boer.

She has a business called Amelia’s Jewelry Designs making earrings, necklaces, and bracelets.

She needed $750 for her half of violin camp.

“I actually went on my mom’s Facebook page and I posted that I have about camp and how I was raising money. A whole bunch of very, very nice kind people decided to help me out and they went on to my Etsy,” said Boer.

In just a couple days, she reached her goal.

“It felt really nice because knowing that there’s people who really want to help you and what you’re trying to do is really nice,” said Boer.

To thank them, Boer sent a video of her playing her violin.

It was legato concerto of appreciation and accomplishment.

“It’s awesome to know that I was actually able to raise my own money,” said Boer. “Drive is being able to know what you’re trying to accomplish and doing something to be able to accomplish it. It takes a lot of effort to get there. Once you get there, things just kind of snowball on top of each other. Then you’re able to do what you set out to do.

She is the conductor of her own goals and aspiration.

Boer hasn’t stopped at just violin camp. She is now selling her jewelry to raise money for college.