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For the birds: Take part in the Great Backyard Bird Count this weekend

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (localmemphis.com) – Environmentalists are hoping you’ll count more than just the love birds this Valentin’s Day. The Great Backyard ...
Hummingbirds gather around a hummingbird feeder filled with sugar water, in a backyard in the San Fernando Valley section of the city of Los Angeles, July 17, 2014. Hummingbirds are among the smallest birds in the world with most species measuring between 7.513 cm (35 in). When hovering in mid-air the tiny avians flap their wings between 40 and 80 times per second. AFP PHOTO / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images)

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (localmemphis.com) – Environmentalists are hoping you’ll count more than just the love birds this Valentin’s Day.

The Great Backyard Bird Count began Friday. The ColliervilleEnvironmental Commission is encouraging everyone to take part in the globaleffort.

According to the journal Science, the bird population has declinedby three billion birds in the last 50 years. That’s nearly 30% of the birdpopulation.

All you have to do is go outside for at least 15 minutes thisweekend and count the number of birds you see, and their species. Then log yourresults.

“It’s just like a treasure hunt. You never knowwhat you’re going to see. I’ve seen a bald eagle out here. I’ve only seen onein the 30 years that I’ve been coming but you just never know what you’re goingto see,” said Sheila Bentley with the Collierville Environmental Commission.

To get started, all you have to do is start an online free account with the Great Backyard Bird Count. CLICK HERE to learn more.

Hummingbirds gather around a hummingbird feeder filled with sugar water, in a backyard in the San Fernando Valley section of the city of Los Angeles, July 17, 2014. Hummingbirds are among the smallest birds in the world with most species measuring between 7.513 cm (35 in). When hovering in mid-air the tiny avians flap their wings between 40 and 80 times per second. AFP PHOTO / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images)