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Memphis Music Hall of Fame celebrates 10-year anniversary

“These incredible music legends not only put Memphis on the world map, it totally changed the complexion of the world forever,” said John Doyle.

MEMPHIS, Tenn. — As we Celebrate Memphis, we're also celebrating the Memphis Music Hall of Fame. 

It's the organization’s 10-year anniversary. To bring it on home, there will be a special one-hour broadcast looking back at the 10-year history.

We stopped by the Memphis Rock ‘n’ Soul Museum ahead of Thursday's celebration.

At the heart of Memphis, aside from the food and culture, is its music.

It has undeniably and inescapably influenced the nation and world.

No matter who you are or where you go, you can’t escape the power of music and its Memphis roots.

“Music is why every country on the planet knows Memphis, Tennessee,” said John Doyle, Memphis Music Hall of Fame and Memphis Rock ‘n’ Soul Museum Executive Director.

Doyle said Memphis navigates the roadmap to music.

“No other city can really honor as many musicians from as many different genres as Memphis, Tennessee can,” said Doyle.

From Issac Hayes, Elvis, Willie Mitchell to STAX, Sun and Ardent Studios, Memphis music has topped many charts.

“These incredible music legends not only put Memphis on the world map, it totally changed the complexion of the world forever,” said Doyle. “We think we’re familiar with Memphis music because we’ve lived it all of our lives here, but yet, this music, these incredible music legends not only put Memphis on the world map, it totally changed the complexion of the world forever…the way we dress. It’s in our movies. It’s in our Super Bowl halftime shows. It’s everywhere.”

It's not just in sound, movies, and style but also historically.

“It’s really about Black music and white music coming together at a time where segregation said don’t come together….At that same time that Dr. King was leading the Civil Rights Movement from a social standpoint, Memphis was leading the Civil Rights Movement from a musical standpoint,” said Doyle.

University of Memphis’ Professor Emeritus of Music, David Evans, said the city’s location and economic and social diversity gave the bass music needed.

“It's surrounded by rural conditions and ways of life in all directions. It's the only city for about 150 or 200 miles around the only big city. And so, it draws from the local region. And that's a such a rich resource, a cultural resource and a musical resource,” said Evans.

“These groups came together to create music that was totally color blind that was totally unheard of in the rest of the world. Memphis did it,” said Doyle.

It continues to do so.

Eric Mackey is an electric guitarist born and raised in Memphis.

“When I’m out on the road performing with different artists, different audience members will ask where are you from. Then I say Memphis. They automatically associate us with STAX and just the Memphis vibe, the Memphis sound,” said Mackey. “We just have this sound and we just have this certain kind of flavor that’s kind of unmatched.”

It is unmatched and undeniably Memphis.

The Memphis Music Hall of Fame airs Thursday at 7 p.m. on Circle Network. You’ll also be able to catch it on-demand.

This weekend, the Heal the Hood Foundation will be hosting a summit for youth and adults interested in the entertainment business.

The event is called “Living the Dream Community Empowerment Summit.”

It takes place Friday, April 1, at 1 p.m. at Overton High School and Saturday, April 2, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Overton High School.

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